2010 AISC Seismic Provisions for Structural Steel Buildings available as free download

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(Chicago, IL) – The 2010 AISC Seismic Provisions for Structural Steel Buildings (ANSI/AISC 341-10) is now available for free downloading on AISC’s website at www.aisc.org/2010SP. This new specification supersedes the 2005 AISC Seismic Provisions for Structural Steel Buildings and all previous versions of this specification. The new specification has been approved by the AISC Committee on Specifications and is ANSI-accredited.

As in the past, the 2010 Seismic Provisions was written as a supplement to the current AISC Specification for Structural Steel Buildings (ANSI/AISC 360-10) and provides design requirements for high seismic force resisting systems. In addition to the usual technical updates and clarifications made in all editions of the Seismic Provisions, the effort for the 2010 edition also focused on an improved format and streamlined presentation. The organization of the chapters has been changed to be more consistent with that of ANSI/AISC 360. In the 2005 edition, the requirements for structural steel buildings were separated from those for composite structural steel/reinforced concrete construction, and were identified as Part I and Part II. In this edition of the Provisions, Part I and Part II have been combined into one cohesive and consistent document.

“The Committee worked hard to make the document more consistent with the format of AISC 360, and presented each seismic force resisting system in an identical format that will make it easier to apply the document,” said James O. Malley, AISC Task Committee 9 (Seismic Design) Chairman. “Combining Parts I and II into a single document required the Committee to expand the composite system requirements substantially so that those systems are now consistent with steel systems.”

Malley continued: “Another major advancement is in the identification of analysis procedures needed to complete capacity-based design requirements for special concentrically braced frame systems. Overall, we believe that the 2010 edition of AISC 341 is a clearer, more user-friendly document. We hope this will assist engineers in improving the seismic design of their structures.”

Please visit the following link to view and/or download the new Seismic Provisions and Commentary: www.aisc.org/2010SP.

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