NFBA 2011 Buildings of the Year

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NFBA recognizes ‘best of the best’ for 2011

The announcement of the Buildings of the Year Awards is one of the highlights at the annual National Frame Building Expo. A large audience gathered for the NFBA luncheon at the America’s Center in St. Louis to honor the winners of these prestigious awards for 2011.

In all, 45 projects as well as their builders were honored. First, second and third places were named in 14 categories, and four Judges’ Awards were presented for exceptional projects in various categories.

The highlight of the program was the announcement of the four Judges’ Awards: Judges’ Best Engineering Award, Judges’ Commercial Unique Award, Judges’ Most Unique Post-Frame Application Award and Judges’ Special Award.

Winners in each category were asked to list the names of the suppliers whose products, such as cladding, windows and insulation, were used in the project. Those suppliers’ names are listed as provided.

NFBA thanks contest judges David Bohnhoff, PE, PhD, University of Wisconsin–Madison; Alan Geisthardt, PE, Plyco Corporation; and Steve Nikkel, Orchard Construction Inc.

AGRICULTURAL STORAGE/WORKSHOPS

Ag Storage-WorkshopFirst Place—Rob Bohnsak, Energy Panel Structures

Pioneer Seed dealership constructed this building to house an office and warehouse. The 100-foot clearspan warehouse provides the space to store product and efficiently load multiple customers’ products at the same time. The office area is energy efficient using post-frame construction and spray foam insulation. The customer is very pleased with the increased efficiency. Post frame was chosen because of the speed of construction and cost benefits over other building types.

Cladding/Roofing: Energy Panel Structures; Windows: Hayfield; Doors: AJ Manufacturing walk doors; Fasteners: Leland Industries; Foundation or structural components: Energy Panel Structures trusses, purlins, girts; Unique products: closed-cell spray foam insulation; Unique accessories: covered porch, wainscot steel.

Second Place—Jim Creech, FBi Buildings Inc.

DF Ag LLP is a farm shop that boasts an agriculture shop and offices, wash bay, tool and welding area, parts storage and conference and break rooms. The 72×104-foot shop is large enough to unfold a 24-row planter for maintenance and the 104×20-foot slanted roof addition allows for ample office space. The 50×18-foot Schwiess hydraulic door is large enough to pull in combines and semis and the attractive angled corner entry, wraparound porch, Perma-Columns, full steel liner package, infrared tube heating system and high-output fluorescent lighting set this building apart from others. Post frame was used because the owner has had great experience with FBi buildings and was able to tour an existing FBi shop to use as a base design.

Cladding/Roofing: McElroy Metal; Windows: Simonton; Doors: AJ; Fasteners: Maze and ITW Buildex; Insulation: Anco Products; Foundation or structural components: FBi, Perma-Column; Unique products: Hydroswing hydraulic door; Unique accessories: Cupolas, loft.

Third place—Eric Goetz—Eric Goetz Master Builder Inc.

Kregel’s Pumpkin Patch has visitors from neighboring schools and churches who enjoy hayrides, corn mazes and a petting zoo. Unique features include the 8-foot wraparound porch for added aesthetics, the 17-foot tall interior clearance giving the customer plenty of storage, the crossbuck bale door and the extended overhang. Post frame was chosen to keep costs down, allowing for the taller eave on the building rather than steel. Post frame is more forgiving and makes it easier to add the “bells and whistles.”

Cladding/Roofing: Wick Buildings; Windows/Doors/Fasteners: Plyco; Foundation or structural components: VanKeppel ready mix; Unique products: Overhead doors (Affordable Garage Doors Inc.); Unique accessories: Cupolas.

COMMERCIAL, LESS THAN 5,000 SQUARE FEET

Comm. 5,000

First Place—Jason Blair, Morton Buildings Inc.

Jeffrey’s Auto Building is a used car dealership office and maintenance shop. The building boasts 6:12 roof pitches on the 60-foot wide and 42-foot wide. The 60-foot trusses are piggyback to get 6:12, which is very unique. The vertical seam, standing seam and turkey tails with braces make the roof pop. Porches, stone wainscot and large windows set off the sides and ends of the facility. Insulation was the big selling point for using post-frame construction. Steel buildings could not match the superior insulation.  

Roofing: Metal Sales Inc.; Windows: Pella Windows; Unique products: 1-3/4-inch standing seam roof; 10-foot fan (Big Ass Fan Co.) in office; Unique accessories: 42×42-inch cupolas, turkey tails with braces and windows under, stone wainscot, carriage house overhead doors, porches wrapped in cedar with stone coming up 36 inches.

Second Place—Don Wagner, Morton Buildings Inc.

Pilot Knob Vineyard built a tasting room to showcase its award-winning wines and to host meetings, weddings and parties. The exterior is native Texas limestone from local quarries with a slurried mortar to give an old-world look. Custom solid mahogany doors with wrought-iron features are used throughout the building and there are indoor and outdoor fireplaces. A 10-foot wraparound porch and pavilion area make for great viewing and outdoor seating. The clearspan allowed the customer to customize the interior layout after many revisions and modifications. Post frame made it easy to customize the interior and exterior.

Roofing: Morton hi-rib steel, McElroy Metal; Windows: Jeld-Wen; Doors: ETO mahogany doors; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Unique products: Custom pine/alder interior sliding barn door; Unique accessories: Cedar clad dormers.

Third place—Loren Caldwell, FBi Buildings Inc.

Mid-Indiana Services Inc., is a uniquely designed convenience store/gas station with a standing seam parapet roof; unique plate-glass entry doors; and mixture of dryvit, brick and steel siding. Post frame was chosen because it is conducive to parapet roof design, has an easier to finish interior and offers a compressed main frame construction timeline.

Cladding/Roofing: McElroy Metal; Windows: Plate Glass; Doors: AJ Manufacturing; Fasteners: Maze Nails and ITW Buildex; Foundation or structural components: Poured in place foundation; Unique products: Standing seam metal roof from McElroy Metal; Unique accessories: Brick wainscoting.

COMMERCIAL, 5,000 TO 10,000 SQUARE FEET

Comm 5-10First Place—Kevin Lawrence, Morton Buildings Inc.

Beachton Denture Clinic is a clinic with a very unique design of wide-open interior spaces that creates a relaxing and comfortable setting. It was built with post frame on a 7-foot deep poured wall foundation with a 36-foot clearspan two-story octagon structure as well as two-story mono slope area that spans 36-foot with clear story windows. The 36-foot clearspan two-story octagon waiting area is a very unique feature. Post frame was chosen due to energy efficiency as well as wanting a LEED platinum rating

Cladding/Roofing: Morton Buildings; Windows: Jeld-Wen; Doors: Thera Tru; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Foundation or structural components: Poured walls via local redi mix; Unique products: Lots of glulam beams to span areas; Unique accessories: Special 36-foot two-story octagon, clearspan.

Second Place—Bill Murray, Fingerlakes Construction Company Inc.

Byrne Dairy–Galeville Store is a convenience store with a Subway restaurant. Because it was replacing the oldest grocery store in Onondaga County and needed to retain the character of the business it was replacing, it was important that it did not look like a plain convenience store. It has a two-story look like the old store and similar layout. The bell on top is from the old store. The speed, energy, efficiency and cost were all factors in choosing post-frame construction.

Cladding: Hardi panel; Roofing: Weather Edge; Windows: AMI and Tubelite; Doors: Kamco and Tubelite; Fasteners: SFS intec.

Third place—Thomas J. Golden, Kistler Pole Building Co. Inc.

This two-story building will house firefighting equipment and trucks, as well as a command center and training area for firefighters. It has many appealing attributes like the covered entrances and retro lighting fixtures mounted by each doorway on the front. Other unique attributes include two roof cupolas with glass walls, stone veneer on front gable of training areas and accent strip wainscot. Post-frame construction allowed for less disturbance of the site by isolating spread footers at each post location and in turn allowed for quicker start of construction time frame.

Cladding: McElroy Metal; Roofing: McElroy Metal (PVDF finish); Windows: Simonton; Doors: Ceco Metal egress doors, “Hepner’s” commercial glass entrance, “General” overhead doors; Fasteners: SFS intec Inc. (screws for cladding), Maze Nails (stone veneer underlay, framing); Insulation: Bluelinx; Foundation or structural components: Perm-Column East concrete post bases; Unique products: 10,000 psi concrete foundation post bases from Perma-Column East; Unique accessories: MWI Components steel cupola with windows, full-vision garage doors.

COMMERCIAL, MORE THAN 10,000 SQUARE FEET

Comm 10First Place—Kevin Lynn Brown, Sappa Valley Construction LLC

The Sunflower Recreation Center serves as a meeting place for the entire community. The center structure houses a movie theater and the two wings spanning to the north and south house a senior center and bowling alley. This cost-effective wood-frame structure has enabled a small community to join together for a common goal and provide much needed services to all of its community members. Post frame allowed the Wick Buildings engineers the ability to design three separate-use facilities under one roof, while keeping cost of construction lower than with other options.

Cladding: 29-gauge G90 Wick Building panels, side lap sealant; Roofing: Snap-Lok standing seam; Windows: Plyco; Doors: Plyco, Manko; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Insulation: 6-inch thick unfaced batt; Foundation or structural components: Concrete floor and footings; Unique accessories: Three mansard covered entries, staggered parapet endwall.

Second Place—Steve Eversole, Eversole Builders Inc.

This building incorporates space for maintenance and repair of garbage trucks, storage and repair of portable toilets, corporate offices and a driver dispatch office area. BSS Waste wanted to build a structure that would allow its company to incorporate all aspects under one roof. Some unique features include a mono-slope roof truss with mansard on three sides, 24 x 24 two-story office and tower hip roof, a clearspan warehouse and shop areas with mezzanines, high bay windows and recessed accent stucco areas in tower. Post frame provided BSS with an energy-efficient building that adds to the local economy.

Cladding: H&H Metals; Roofing: Mansea Metals; Windows: Plyco; Doors: Plyco, Manko; Fasteners: Fasteners Direct; Insulation: Anco Co and ETO Contracting; Unique products: Use of R19 icynene insulation; mezzanines and tool rooms; Unique accessories: Mansard roof system/corner tower system, which is the anchor for the whole building.

Third place—Steve Olson, Menard Inc.

Thorsport Racing was built to manufacture NASCAR “Camping World Trucks.” The project included demolition and replacement of parts of existing post-frame structures, complete rehab of an existing building that wasn’t completely demolished and two new attached structures, also post frame. The new building also has curtain wall glass with post-frame construction.

Cladding: Premium pro-rib with Nova brick; Roofing: Premium pro-rib; Windows: Curtain wall glass; Doors: Various; Fasteners: ABC; Insulation: Fiberglass; Foundation or structural components: Existing concrete pier and beam systems and post frame; Unique products: Curtain wall glass.

HOBBY SHOPS

Hobby ShopsFirst Place—Brad Kollman, Morton Buildings Inc.

Bergeland/Link Recreation and Guest Center will be used to store extra vehicles and boats and provide an overflow sleeping area for guests with a recreation area on the upper level that includes a kitchen, bar, sitting area and outdoor deck. The building was designed to have an old farm granary look to complement the restored barn on site that has been remodeled into a home. The open floor space was created by using a single support beam in the middle of the building for the glulam and LVL rafter system. Stamped concrete floor was used in the bunk area and solid wood flooring was used in the upper level. Post frame offered the best energy efficiency and the shell could be constructed rapidly, allowing the interior contractors to get working.

Cladding/Roofing: Morton Building Hi-Rib (AkzoNobel finish); Windows: Hayfield Window & Door Company, sliding windows; Doors: Pella Corporation, Pella Designer French-style patio doors, AJ Manufacturing; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Insulation: Johns Mansville PEBS blanket; Unique products: Glulam ridge support beams with LVL rafters; Unique accessories: Vintage cupola.

Second Place—Stephen M. Hamm, Morton Buildings Inc.

The shop portion of this ecologically friendly building is used for storage and maintenance of personal equipment and the living quarters are used as a weekend retreat. In the late fall columns were set in the ground and the concrete floor (including radiant heat tubing) was poured. The building was erected through the winter. Post frame was chosen for its energy efficiency and speed and method of construction.

Cladding/Roofing: Morton Buildings Inc.; Windows: Pella Impervia; Doors: AJ Manufacturing (walk doors), Raynor (overhead sectional doors); Fasteners: Morton Buildings; Insulation: Knauf; Foundation or structural components: Morton Buildings; Unique accessories: Cupolas by Morton Buildings Inc.

Third place—Korrie Lange, FBi Buildings Inc.

This building houses garage, shop, storage and living spaces. It includes floor step-down, lot, trapezoid windows, fake crossbuck doors, 10:12 pitch, 18-foot LVL clearspan rafters, an open porch and a knotty-pine car siding interior with cedar staircase. Post frame was chosen because it was the most cost-effective solution to this multipurpose building, providing the option for open space with clearspan trusses.

Cladding/Roofing: McElroy Metal; Windows: Simonton; Doors: AJ Manufacturing; Fasteners: Maze Nails and ITW Buildex; Insulation: Anco (customer provided); Foundation or structural components: Concrete; Unique products: Trapezoid windows; Unique accessories: Loft, porch.

HORSE BARNS, LESS THAN 3,000 SQUARE FEET

HB 3,000First Place—Jesse Holzemer, Morton Buildings Inc.

This barn was designed to look old and fit into the natural landscape of the OH Ranch. The barn sits on a historic site by one of Sheridan’s local heroes and was built in a high snow-load and wind area. The siding and stain finish are designed to age. Unique features include the granite countertops and commercial sink unit. This barn looks as though it has been there for more than 100 years and will still be standing for 100 more.

Cladding: Cedar Siding, Lifetime Aging stain; Roofing: Morton Buildings High Rib Steel; Windows: Hayfield; Doors: AJ Manufacturing; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Insulation: CertainTeed; Foundation or structural components: MBI; Unique products: Rock from site on wainscoting, light fixtures, commercial steel sink unit; Unique accessories: Granite countertops, stall mats.

Second Place—Zach Sobaski, Easter Iowa Building Inc. — Lester Building Systems LLC Dealer

The building will be used to house two retired Budweiser Clydesdale horses. 6:12 scissor trusses were used to provide more headroom in the hay loft and an elevator was built inside the building to take hay into the loft and down to the horses. The building is heated and air-conditioned for the horses. The ease of incorporating the second-story loft into the building also was a deciding factor for post-frame construction.

Cladding/Roofing: Lester Building Systems; Windows: Plyco; Doors: Harvard Products–Wayne Dalton; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Insulation: Johns Manville; Unique products: Classic Equine; Unique accessories: Cupolas, custom-made stalls and second-story hay loft with elevator.

Third place—Steve Case, Morton Buildings Inc.

The Grindstone Cattle Company uses this building to stall horses used on the ranch and a tack room is used as a control room for the cattle scales at the ranch. Gambrel style with hand-hewn grizzly board siding with chinking and batten board cedar siding in gables gave the outside of the building a look of old weathered logs. The barn also included a complete hay loft with sliding loft doors and a 12-foot porch covering scales for cattle weighing. Post frame was chosen because it allowed for the correct placements of stalls and tack rooms and a complete hay loft, provided additional strength for snow loading and wind loads and had a pleasing overall appearance.

Cladding: Lester Building Sy Cold Water Timber (grizzly wood); Roofing: Morton hi-rib; Windows: Hayfield; Doors: Diamond “M”; Insulation: Thermax; Unique products: Wall storage racks for saddles, shovels, bridles, hand-hewn wood siding, 12-foot porch.

HORSE BARN, 3,000 TO 10,000 SQUARE FEET

HB 3-10First Place—James P. Hochmuth, Fuog Interbuild Inc.

St. Bride’s is a horse barn and equestrian office. It was built as an environmentally responsible “green structure” with sustainable wood species in a combination of post-frame and conventional frame design and construction, many recycled elements and energy-efficient technology. All structural framing was done in KD fir dimensional lumber. The barn also has radiant floor heating, site-built corbels, fly mist, concealed wiring, a vet/farrier room, equipment storage room, tack and wash stalls, feed room, two half-baths and two lofts.

Cladding: Shelter Products Inc., Portland, Ore.; Roofing: McElroy Metal; Windows: Marvin windows; Doors: Marvin personnel doors, Wayne Dalton Garage Doors, Innovative Equine Systems DD; Fasteners: Simpson; Insulation: Davenport; Unique products: Nelson Manufacturing Auto stall waterers, Kalglo heaters, Evo-pave pavers; Unique accessories: Innovative Equine systems stalls, site-built cupolas.

Second Place—Troy Erickson, Morton Buildings Inc.

The building features swinging Diamond “M” doors. It is actually three buildings with many functions under one roof. The customer wanted a well-constructed barn that would be functional and would complement her home. The building features T&G walls on interior and powder-coated steel stalls. The family can utilize the entire building, workshop, stall barn, tack, wash stall, office and full lot.

Roofing: Morton Buildings Hi-rib; Windows: Hayfield; Doors: Morton Buildings walk doors/Dutch doors/sliding; Fasteners: Morton Buildings stainless steel screws and nails; Insulation: Dow Inc.–heavy duty Thermax; Unique products: Morton Buildings swinging Diamond “M” doors; Unique accessories: Morton Buildings 30×30-inch cupolas, stalls and feeders.

Third place—Jim Groat, Mystic Meadows Construction LLC -— Wick Buildings

This stall barn is used by Mackinac Island residents and 4H members and is available for internships through Michigan State University. It was constructed with 6:12 roof pitch, 2-1/4-inch R/S beech wood flooring throughout, 18-inch overhangs and valley systems. Material had to be delivered to the site by ferries and horse-drawn drays; the crews accessed the site by bicycles. Wick’s semis were the largest vehicles ever allowed on the island and had to be approved by the Mackinac Island Historical Park Commission.

Cladding/Roofing: Wick Buildings; Windows/Doors: Plyco; Fasteners: SFS intec; Insulation: Bay Insulation; Foundation or structural components: Cheboygan Cement Company; Unique products: Classic Equine Stalls; thick and thin flooring-wood planks for flooring; Unique accessories: MWI Components cupolas and ridge vents; Classic Equine providing custom stalls.

HORSE BARNS, MORE THAN 10,000 SQUARE FEET

HB 10First Place—Gene Kurtz, Kurtz Inc. — Lester Building Systems LLC Dealer

Blue Meadow Farm is a commercial equine boarding and training facility with metered automatic waterers allowing owners to monitor animals’ water usage at a glance. Wash stalls and grooming stalls allow for plenty of space and light to work. The engineering flexibility of budget-friendly post-frame construction allowed for more flexibility in animal traffic patterns and the substantial hay storage over the stalls.

Cladding/Roofing: Lester; Windows: Pella; Doors: Lester/AJ Manufacturing; Lester; Unique accessories: Cupolas, metered waterers.

Second Place—Keith J. Pinkelman, Lynnman Construction LLC — Wick Buildings

This horse arena, which included stalls and an office, was built as a riding area for kids and adults with disabilities. A riding facility for the disabled was not available in the area and was needed. All the money raised for construction was through donations. The post-frame construction was cost-effective and helped with the design layout, quickness of construction and the ability to utilize a shingled roof per the customer’s request. Other unique features include twenty 4 x 3-foot windows, 24-inch overhangs, wainscoting, drywall ceilings, 60-foot valley system and breezeway over the front entry doors. A comfort-controlled lobby and office allows parents to view the activities.

Cladding: Wick Building; Roofing: CertainTeed; Windows/Doors: Plyco; Fasteners: SFS intec; Insulation: Anco Products; Unique accessories: Classic Equine stalls; stalls from Triton Barns.

Third place—Bill Hamm, Walters Buildings

The barn at Oak Hills Farms has room to house six to eight horses. The three existing structures were removed and replaced with the new horse complex that has all the customer’s needs under one roof. The building includes eave lights running down both sides of the arena along with several skylights. The lean-to is raftered with purlins let in to make the building appear to be larger and to reduce birds’ nesting areas. Post frame was selected because there was no need to install frost walls and the cost was 20 percent less than steel frame.

Cladding/Roofing: Walters Buildings; Windows: AJ Manufacturing, Slesar Glass; Doors: AJ Manufacturing, Lifetime overhead doors; Fasteners: SFS intec; Insulation: Bay Insulation, Alpine Insulation; Foundation or structural components: Mechanically laminated Walters’ STP–Walters Buildings; Unique accessories: MWI Components, Cannonball:HNP.

HOUSING/HOMES/RESIDENTIAL

ResFirst Place—James Taylor, Morton Buildings Inc.

This home is the hub for the NW Ranch. It houses guests, hosts parties and gives the homeowner a beautiful place to kick up his feet at the end of a long day. The entire structure is post frame. This was chosen because of the ability to use a 15.5” truss head and the use of 2×8 framing allowed for R-30 blanket insulation in the walls. Couple that with R-50 blown-in fiberglass insulation and R-48 SIP panels, and the energy efficiency is amazing. Unique is the use of hand-hewn exposed timber trusses over the living area with an SIP panel roof.

Cladding: James Hardie 50-year 7-inch lap siding and Sunset Stone 2-inch veneer rock; Roofing: DECRA Shake metal shingles; Windows: Marvin; Doors: Therma-Tru entry doors, Marvin Premier French doors; Foundation or structural components: Dave Doyle concrete, large retaining walls/footing foundation; Unique products: 6 x 20 Doug-Fir hand-hewn timber trusses with black powder-coated gusset plates; Unique accessories: 3-foot corbels in the gables, in-floor geothermal heating system.

Second Place—Karla Goskusky, Morton Buildings Inc.

The owners previously built a garage and porch using post frame and were so happy with the efficiency of that building they chose post-frame construction again. No supporting interior walls were a plus for the owners as well. The cedar-wrapped porch columns and arched headers invite you into their home. The porch is 8-foot wide by 42 feet long — more than enough room to relax or entertain guests. This beautiful home features an all-steel exterior that provides maintenance-free upkeep. The vaulted ceilings in the living room and kitchen create an open atmosphere for this cozy haven.

Cladding/Roofing: Morton Buildings; Windows/Doors: Pella; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Insulation: Corning; Unique products: Cedar-wrapped porch columns, 100+-year-old timber from local elevator as false header; Unique accessories: copper-topped cupolas, functional dormer, functional octagon window.

Third place—Steve Bardin and Kevin Caughey, Morton Buildings Inc.

This Lake George residence is a second home and family compound. Constructed into rock ledge with minimal level surfaces, the full three stories include a walk-out basement. Additional features include a combination of roof truss and rafter designs, second- and third-floor cantilevered porches and a PVDF-coated steel roof. The building is Energy Star rated. Post frame was selected for the energy efficiency of large wall cavity insulation, strength of the frame system against snow and wind loads and timeline for construction.

Cladding: James Hardie plank lap siding with 7” reveal; Roofing: Morton; Windows/Doors: Pella; Insulation: Fiberglass batt and fiberglass blown-in; Foundation or structural components: Partial retaining wall; Unique accessories: Balconies, patio, roof hips and valleys.

INDUSTRIAL

IndustFirst Place—Rollie Radtke, RAM Buildings Inc.

This 40 x 92 x 45-foot batch plant cover is used to protect a concrete batch plant with 60 x 44 x 12-foot attached office so it can run year round. This building has a 45-foot ceiling height, accomplished by bracing the wood columns back to the main structure of the equipment. The office is accented by deep fascia overhangs and block wainscot. Post frame was significantly less costly than the steel frame alternative and allowed for a nice, clean interior finish. It also allowed for construction over the equipment while the plant was in operation.

Cladding/Roofing: Metal Sales; Windows/Doors: AJ Manufacturing; Fasteners: SFS intec; Insulation: API; Foundation or structural components: Littfin Truss Company.

Second Place—Zach Sobaski, Eastern Iowa Building Inc.  — Lester Building Systems LLC Dealer

The building will be used to manufacture organic pies and baby food. The building had to fit the surroundings and be approved by the Amana Colonies. Geothermal heating and cooling were used for energy efficiency and environmental impact. As an organic food manufacturer, the customer is very environmentally conscious and chose post frame for its speed of construction, energy efficiency and efficient use of material. It’s a unique use for a post-frame building.

Cladding/Roofing: Lester Building Systems; Windows: Plyco; Doors: Harvard Products and Wayne Dalton; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Insulation: Johns Manville; Unique products: MWI Components; Unique accessories: Cupolas, geothermal heat/air conditioning.

Third place—Jerry Wagner, M.P.B. Builders Inc.

This building serves as the office for this four-building complex and provides housing for a big metal baler for iron. A unique aspect of this building is its height from the two stories at the office 22-foot clear end to the 34-foot clear end to accommodate semis dumping into the metal baler. The height allows a semi load of loose cans to be dumped at one time and then the doors to be shut. The main reason a post-frame design was chosen was the ease of insulation.

Cladding/Roofing: Wheeling Channeldrain Panel Spectra Cote System 29 gauge; Windows: AJ Manufacturing Inc. Series 900 Thermal Aluminum; Doors: AJ Manufacturing Inc. Series 7100 Thermally Broken Door; Fasteners: SFS intec; Insulation: Bay Insulation; Foundation or structural components: Grade beam construction brackets for posts #4 bar 12 inches on center floor; Unique products: Oversized windows, loading docks, epoxy in office; Unique accessories: Two-story with 125-pound truss loading over office.

INSTITUTIONAL

InstitutionalFirst Place—Jim Rollins, Walters Buildings

This expansion to Ninevah Christian Church gave the congregation a 750-seat sanctuary, additional bathrooms and accessory rooms. Post-frame construction was chosen for versatility and speed in construction. Construction included 71-foot piggyback trusses with 35-foot hip trusses to give the sanctuary a hexagonal area with 21-foot ceiling. It has architectural skewed spans and rooflines. In addition, it has two fire walls to eliminate the need for sprinklers. The congregation was meeting in the basement for 2 years because of its growth and had to split into three worship services. Now the entire congregation can be accommodated in the space, allowing them to worship together in one service.

Cladding/Roofing: Walters Buildings; Windows: Lowes Home Center; Doors: Kidd Glass; Fasteners: SFS intec, Maze Nails; Insulation: KC Creek Construction; Foundation or structural components: TW Concrete Construction; Unique products: Superior Fiberglass steeple; Unique accessories: Steeple, silent floor joists.

Second Place—Paul Alteri, Fingerlakes Construction Company Inc.

The building is used as an ambulance station. It provides the organization a place to train, house equipment and socialize. This building sits in a residential neighborhood, and it was designed and built to fit into its surroundings. The neighbors have made many positive comments about the building. Post-frame construction was chosen over other construction types because of the energy efficiency and the economical value post-frame construction offers.

Cladding/Roofing: CertainTeed; Windows: Auburn Millwork; Atrium (customer supplied); Doors: Plyco; Insulation: CertainTeed; Foundation or structural components: 2,500 psi footers with laminated columns; Unique products: Window and door pediments, wide columns, fish-scale siding; Unique accessories: Porches with wide columns, window pediments.

Third place—Loren Caldwell, FBi Buildings Inc.

Heritage Lodge at Wabash Park Camp is used as a church camp retreat for camps, meetings, retreats and weddings. It accommodates up to 36 people with six bedrooms (each with a bathroom), a kitchen and a meeting room. Additional features include a central stone fireplace, wraparound porch, dormers and air entry. Post-frame design provided a better overall design to give the roof pitch, interior height, aesthetics and flexibility to maximize the use of the space.

Cladding/Roofing: McElroy Metal; Windows-Doors: Therma-Tru; Fasteners: Maze Nails and ITW Buildex; Insulation: Anco Products; Foundation or structural components: FBi Buildings; Unique products: Cultured stone.

LIVESTOCK FACILITIES

livestockFirst Place—Jason Potts, FBi Buildings Inc.

Butlerview Farms is a controlled environment for high-dollar show cattle. Sloped concrete foundation, hipped porch, valleys, crossbuck doors, aluminum porch columns, washable liner, individual sliding doors and ceiling vents set this facility apart from others. Post frame was chosen for its clearspan and overall size, ventilation and cost-effectiveness. This facility houses some of the most famous cows in the world, including the 2011 Global Cow of the year, Regancrest S. Chassity.

Cladding/Roofing: McElroy Metal; Windows: AJ Manufacturing; Doors: AJ Manufacturing walk doors, FBi Buildings sliding doors; Fasteners: Maze Nails and ITW Buildex; Insulation: Spray foam; Foundation or structural components: Posts on concrete; Unique products: Old south aluminum columns, nu-plank interior; Unique accessories: FBi manufactured crossbuck sliding doors, cupola with windows, aluminum columns, individual sliding doors.

Second Place—Russ Breit and Bill Hamm, Walters Buildings

This building is set up for raising heifers from just after weaning to just before freshening. This building will allow the owner to closely monitor his animals’ health. The building is built on 4-foot high concrete walls to allow for the manure pack to build up and allow the heifers to have a dry place to lie down. It is constructed with rafter and purlins set in clips to maximize air flow and reduce bird-nesting areas. Using 20-feet on center rafters was about $20,000 less expensive than a steel frame building.

Cladding/Roofing: Walters Buildings; Doors: AJ Manufacturing, CHI overhead doors; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Insulation: Bay Insulation; Foundation or structural components: Walters Buildings; Unique products: 3-1/2 x 18-inch micro-lams, Wausau Supply; Unique accessories: Dairy curtains, Agri Curtains.

Third place—Michael Fox, Getterr Done Construction Inc.

This building at Steuernagel Farms is a covered manure area to separate water runoff from manure. Unique features include the Wick Building System, Starwood trusses, concrete stem walls, cattle staging pens on self-cleaning counter slope, cattle shoot, vet room and manure ramp. Post frame was selected because of diversity, cost and the overall ability to cross function with style and class at a reasonable price.

Cladding/Roofing: Wick Buildings; Windows: Plyco; Doors: Plyco, Amarr; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Insulation: R-19 in vet room; Unique products: Perma-Column brackets on concrete, accent banding; Unique accessories: Cupola, cattle shoot, vet room, 3/12 counter slope; 3-foot close soffits, deep fascia steel, lightning protection, weather vane (moon), shutters on window, push of ramp, accent banding.

RETROFIT/REMODEL

RetrofitFirst Place—Todd Norton, Todd Norton Construction LLC — Wick Buildings

Vienna Woodworks uses this restored building to build log and barn wood furniture. The building is heated and completed furniture is stored on the second floor. The first floor houses an assembly area and a spray room. The existing barn is part of the history of the area and has been preserved by restoration and put to practical use. Glass cupolas add to the look and give light to the second story. In-floor heat system heats the first floor and is fueled by an outdoor wood-burning stove. The new 40 x 24 addition is used for packaging and shipping. Post frame was the best method to construct this facility because of costs, design and long-term maintenance.

Cladding/Roofing: Wick Buildings; Windows: Hayfield; Doors: Plyco; Insulation: Bay Insulation; Unique products: In-floor heating system; Unique accessories: Cupola by MWI Components.

Second Place—Tammy Somerville, Custom Structures Inc. — Wick Buildings

LP Collision, a commercial auto repair shop, needed more space for its growing business. It was much easier to match up to the existing Wick buildings using post-frame construction. The sidewall overheads required hefty engineering. Post frame was more cost effective and a quick building process.

Cladding/Roofing: Wick Buildings; Windows/Doors: Plyco; Foundation or structural components: Poured footings, steel beams, multiple columns; Unique products: Structurally unique for large amount of sidewall overhead doors.

SUBURBAN GARAGES

GaragesFirst Place—Glen Hochstetler, Hochstetler Buildings Inc.

The client’s goal was to build her dream garage that appeared to be built in the same era as her 1930s-era house. It has three purposes: one area is a heated garage, another is a heated workshop and the upstairs is an open guest room. With the I-joist system for the second floor and rafters 30 inches above the floor, post-frame construction was the perfect design for this project. Post-frame design allowed for a shorter construction time and reduced the foundation costs. To accomplish these goals, many distinct features — 12:12 pitch roof with 4:12 shed dormers, standing seam roof, multiple porches, board and batten siding, custom cupola with copper roof and special crossbuck design on the doors — were used.

Cladding: CertainTeed; Roofing: Metal Formed Goods; Windows: Andersen; Doors: Plyco; Foundation or structural components: Hoge Lumber Company; Unique accessories: Custom-built cupola with copper roof.

Second Place—Thomas J. Golden, Kistler Pole Building Company Inc.

This building is a garage on the lower floor with an art studio upstairs. This building features two peaked gable dormers on the front. The rear has a raised shed dormer look with accented gable overhang to match the front slope. Post frame provided immediate start of construction with shorter construction time. It also enabled the ability to install many windows upstairs and still maintain the needed structural integrity to withstand the forces of nature.

Cladding: Hardie Panel masonry panel siding; Roofing: Everlast Roofing; Windows: Simonton; Doors: Jeld-Wen entry doors and carriage style overhead doors; Fasteners: SFS intec, Maze Nails; Insulation: Bluelinx batten type insulation; Foundation or structural components: Perma-Column East concrete post base; Unique accessories: MWI Components steel cupola with cow weather vane and dormers.

Third place—Allen Ivey, FBi Buildings Inc.

This building is used for gatherings with family and friends, for storing collectable cars and lawn equipment and as a hobby shop. Unique features of this building include dormers, cupolas, flying overhangs, 6:12 pitch, crossbuck panels, open porch, overhead doors and in-floor radiant heat. Post frame was chosen because of its large clearspan, the ability to insulate well and the longevity of the exterior siding.

Cladding: McElroy Metal; Roofing: TAMKO; Windows/Doors: AJ Manufacturing; Fasteners: Maze Nails and ITW Buildex; Insulation: Anco Products; Unique products: In-floor heat; Unique accessories: Cupolas, dormers, flying overhangs, porch, fake crossbuck doors (Cannonball:HNP).

JUDGES’ BEST ENGINEERING AWARD

J-BEJason Halverson, Walters Buildings

What started as an energy center to house controls and equipment to provide power to a 1,088-square-foot custom home evolved into a high-end horse barn with living quarters and a full second-level conference room that the owner uses to describe to visitors and media the various sources of energy being used (solar, wind, geo-tech). Post frame gave flexibility to install various components. Post frame allowed for the very high R-values specified and still offer clearspans and cathedral ceilings that satisfied the owner’s design aesthetics. Upper room is built within attic truss with piggyback truss above. The building has a standing seam roof with solar panels and stepped overhang. Columns were bolted to concrete frost walls because the site was on a hillside. Part of the building is classic post frame with standard horse stalls. CNN did a feature clip on the energy center in August 2011.

Cladding: Root Roder Hardwoods–Walls Cedar Board and Batten; Roofing: McElroy Metal Medallion–Lok Panels; Windows: Andersen; Doors: AJ Manufacturing; Fasteners: Maze Nails; Insulation: Expert Insulation; Unique products: Cedar Board and Batten Exterior; Unique accessories: Cupolas, dormers, solar panels, oak stalls, skylights.

JUDGES’ COMMERCIAL UNIQUE AWARD

BE-UniqueBill Murray, Fingerlakes Construction Company, Inc.

Byrne Dairy–Galeville Store is a convenience store with a Subway restaurant. Because it was replacing the oldest grocery store in Onondaga County and needed to retain the character of the business it was replacing, it was important that it did not look like a plain convenience store. It has a two-story look like the old store and similar layout. The bell on top is from the old store. The speed, energy, efficiency and cost were all factors in choosing post-frame construction.

Cladding: Hardi panel; Roofing: Weather Edge; Windows: AMI and Tubelite; Doors: Kamco and Tubelite; Fasteners: SFS intec.

JUDGES’ MOST UNIQUE POST-FRAME APPLICATION AWARD

J-Un appBrent Ryan and Joel Hasse, Morton Buildings Inc.

This building provides a maintenance and storage facility for a high-end estate located near Lake Geneva, Wis. Included in the building design is a 40 x 24-foot area for the farm office, meeting room, break room and restroom with storage above; a 40 x 48-foot area for maintenance of farm equipment with a 12 x 48-foot truss-supported loft above a 40 x 56-foot area for equipment storage with two 12 x 56-foot truss-supported lofts above; 40 x 120-foot area for equipment storage with two 12 x 120-foot truss-supported lofts above; 10 x 120-foot open-sided area for equipment storage and firewood storage; and a 10 x 40-foot open-sided area for equipment storage and firewood storage. The versatility of post-frame construction allowed for the truss-supported loft areas that, in turn, provided a completely open ground floor level to store farm and maintenance equipment without interference of support columns.

Cladding: James Hardie; Roofing: SDI and Precoat Metals, Morton Buildings; Windows: Hayfield; Doors: AJ Manufacturing; Fasteners: Maze Nails, SFS intec; Insulation: Knauf Insulation, Owens Corning; Foundation or structural components: Treated wood columns in ground with ready mix stilt footings; Unique accessories: One custom wide eyebrow with braces; one custom wide eyebrow overhand with pitch break; three custom shed dormers with continuous column wall and pitch break; one 6-foot square cupola with copper PVDF hi-rib steel roof; eight Hayfield fixed vinyl windows and copper eagle weathervane; three 42-inch square cupolas with copper PVDF steel roof; one 12 x 48-foot truss-supported loft; two 12 x 56-foot truss-supported lofts; and two 12 x 120-foot truss-supported lofts.

JUDGES’ SPECIAL AWARD

J-specialJames P. Hochmuth, Fuog Interbuild Inc.

St. Bride’s is a horse barn and equestrian office. It was built as an environmentally responsible “green structure” with sustainable wood species in a combination of post-frame and conventional frame design and construction, many recycled elements and energy-efficient technology. All structural framing was done in KD fir dimensional lumber. The barn also has radiant floor heating, site-built corbels, fly mist, concealed wiring, a vet/farrier room, equipment storage room, tack and wash stalls, feed room, two half-baths and two lofts.

Cladding: Shelter Products Inc., Portland, OR; Roofing: McElroy Metal; Windows: Marvin windows; Doors: Marvin personnel doors, Wayne Dalton Garage Doors, Innovative Equine Systems DD; Fasteners: Simpson; Insulation: Davenport; Unique products: Nelson Manufacturing Auto stall waterers, Kalglo heaters, Evo-pave pavers; Unique accessories: Innovative Equine systems stalls, site-built cupolas.

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